Help me win a place in the Fjällräven Polar

The best adventures often aren’t the “Bucket List” ideas that you dream about for years and years. Sometimes they are the things that happen just when you’re in the right place at the right time, things that you stumble across as you browse websites, flick through magazines or get chatting to people that you meet.

I think I’ve found my next adventure. The newsletter for my favourite outdoor magazine popped into my inbox on a quiet morning, topped with a picture of a person swaddled in Arctic gear, face hidden by ski goggles and a fur-trimmed hood, standing alongside a team of sled dogs waiting to be hitched up. I managed to read the words “Take part in…” before I’d followed the link to the event. I want this.

 

The Fjällräven Polar is an event that takes place in the Scandinavian Arctic, a 300km dogsled run through the mountains and over the tundra, from Signaldalen in northern Norway, to the forest around Jukkasjärvi in Sweden, finishing on the frozen lake. Participants camp out each night of the expedition, which takes place in April, when temperatures have been known to drop to minus 30°C and even lower, especially with biting wind sweeping across the treeless tundra.

Despite the extreme conditions, the event is for ordinary people, not survival experts or polar explorers, looking for the adventure of a lifetime. It aims to give people the chance to discover the harsh beauty of the Arctic, to test themselves in a challenging environment, and show how the right equipment and knowledge can open up new experiences.

Entry is limited to 20 people, two from each “country”identified by Fjällräven*. One of these will automatically win a place by receiving the most votes on their application on the website. The other person will be selected by Fjällräven to take part in the event.

I’ve got a long way to go to beat some of the other British entries, especially as they’ve had almost 3 weeks longer to garner votes than me (and may even have been planning their campaign since last year). So here is my appeal: please help me win a place in the Fjällräven Polar! Follow this link to my profile, and click on the button to vote. I promise to share my stories with you when I get back.

Thank you for your support.

All images in this post are from Fjällräven.co.uk or Fjällrävenpolar.com

*Participants in the event will come from each of the following countries or groups: Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland, Germany, UK, USA, Hungary, Benelux (Belgium, Netherlands, Luxembourg) and other countries (the Rest of the World)!

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12 Days of Christmas #9: Solstice

Today is the darkest day of the year in the Northern hemisphere; the winter solstice.  Also known as the longest night or the shortest day, this is the day on which the sun has its lowest daily maximum elevation in the sky, the point where the sun stands still (solstice is derived from the Latin sol, sun, and sistere, to stand still).  From tomorrow morning we’ll start to see the gradual lengthening of days and shortening of nights, a reversal of the pattern seen up until now.

This seasonal pattern of decline, death, rebirth and growth was extremely important to ancient peoples and midwinter was an important turning point in the year; a time for family gatherings, celebration and feasting, often with fires or candles lit during the hours of darkness.  Many of these ancient rituals inspired and informed the familiar traditions surrounding Christmas and other winter festivals celebrated today.

The movements of the sun are traced in a number of ancient buildings and structures around the world.  Here are 5 of the most well-known places to observe the winter solstice.

5.  Karnak temple complex, Luxor, Egypt.  On the solstice, the sun rises between the uprights of the gate of Nectanebo, illuminating the sanctuary of Amoun-Re and the obelisk of Hatchepsut.

Sunrise at Karnak. Image from wilderness-ventures-egypt.com

4.  Mnajdra temple complex, Malta.  One of the most ancient known religious sites on Earth, the lowest temple at Mnajdra is aligned so that light from sunrises at the vernal and autumnal equinoxes passes through the main doorway and along the main axis of the site.  On the solstices sunlight illuminates the megaliths at either side of the doorway.

Winter solstice at Mnajdra, Malta. Image from gozonews.com

3.  Maeshowe, Orkney, Scotland.  At more than 5000 years old, the Maeshowe chambered cairn is at the heart of the UNESCO World Heritage Site covering several neolithic sites on the mainland of Orkney.  An image of the rising sun is projected on to the back wall of the tomb.

Maeshowe, Orkney. Image from Orkneyjar.com

2.  Newgrange (Brú na Bóinne), County Meath, Ireland.  Visitors to the prehistoric tomb at Newgrange can apply to a lottery for tickets to witness the solstice sunrise as it illuminates the inside of the chamber.  More than 25,000 people apply each year, but only 10 tickets are allocated.

Sunlight floods the chamber in Newgrange. Image from irishcentral.com

1.  Stonehenge, Wiltshire, England.  Despite heavy rain last night, more than 3,500 people are reported to have gathered at Stonehenge to watch the sunrise this morning.

Druids celebrating the solstice at Stonehenge, England. Image from nationalgeographic.co.uk

12 Days of Christmas #6: Reindeer

I love reindeer.  I’ve been to visit the reindeer herd that live on the Cairngorm plateau in Scotland, and I’ve seen some grazing in fields next to the Hringvegur (ring road) in the Eastfjords of Iceland.  I’ve been to Finnish Lapland and watched families take rides in reindeer-drawn sleds, and seen the Sami round-up pens in Kautokeino and Karasjok.

IMG_0491v2Skiing on the empty fells above Båtsfjord  a small herd of reindeer crossed over the crest of the hill to our front.  They continued down towards us, the only sound in the still* air was the soft crunch of snow under their feet.

*A tenuous link to Ailsa’s weekly travel theme of still.

12 Days of Christmas #5: Oh Christmas Tree!

IMG_2204Things are becoming considerably more festive at home now.  This afternoon I picked up a Christmas tree from a nearby Country Park, then dug out the fairy lights and decorations from the loft.  Now I’m sitting next to a twinkling, sparkly masterpiece (albeit sitting in a wastepaper bin held down with my diving weight belt), and picking pine needles out of my socks. Continue reading

12 Days of Christmas #3: Have you met the Yule Goat?

Thinking about animals associated with this time of year, and there’s a few contenders that might pop into your head.  Reindeer most likely, red noses or not; a donkey, the stable (hohoho!) of a school nativity play, not to mention the camels of the Wise Men; sometimes even penguins and polar bears appear in festive displays.  And who can resist this compilation of cute creatures wearing Santa hats from the Top 10 of Everything?

Too cute to even quantify.

But did you know about the Yule Goat?  Continue reading

12 Days of Christmas #1: ‘Zat You, Santa Claus?

With 12 days to go until Christmas, I’m still not feeling particularly festive.  I’ve yet to put any decorations, gifts for family and friends still only exist on a list written on a scrap of paper, and today was a grey, rainy day.  I’ve been quite preoccupied, with a job interview this morning, and only now, sitting with a glass of wine in front of the television, that I’ve realised just how close it is!  So over the next 12 days, I thought I’d find out what people in other parts of the world do at Christmas time, whilst I catch up with my preparations. Continue reading