Why you should try birdwatching.

BirdwatchingHello. My name is Vicky, and I am a birdwatcher.

I have many and varied interests (well, don’t we all?), but one thing that makes my heart go a-flutter more than most is grabbing my binoculars and keeping tabs on the local birdlife. It started as out a necessity, a university research project mapping the food web of an intertidal mudflat. Just work out who eats what…, and my interest grew slowly from that.

I’ve watched spear-sharp gannets dive for fish on the Scottish coast as I sailed by. I’ve hiked into a kauri forest in New Zealand at night searching for kiwis shuffling through the undergrowth. I spotted an improbably balanced toucan in a kapok tree as I set up a bivvy in the Belizean jungle. And every autumn I watch out for skeins of brent geese, like squadrons of aircraft, returning from the Arctic to my local coast.
birdwatching_scope_2.1.jpeg

What wild creature is more accessible to our eyes and ears, as close to us and everyone in the world, as universal as a bird?

David Attenborough

Birdwatching brings all kinds of small pleasures; spotting something new and exciting, or something friendly and familiar; being outdoors and feeling the wind and weather around you; becoming attuned to the surroundings and focusing on observation. For me, it beats any kind of meditation or mindfulness practice.
puffins

Five tips for beginner birders

  • Begin at the beginning. Start by noticing what’s going on in your garden or local park. You can even put some feeders out to encourage birds close to where you can see them. Observe things like size, colour, behaviour; think about how you’d describe them and start to put some names to the regular visitors. The RSPB Bird Identifier is great to help get you started.
  • Get some gear. Basic birdwatching doesn’t need much; just looking and listening can often be enough to get you started. A field guide will help with identification, as will a notebook to jot down or sketch what you’ve seen. Good walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing will make your life more comfortable out in the field. Investing in pair of binoculars is the next step. Beginner level binoculars can be picked up for between £50 and £100, and decent pairs are often available second hand. Look for a good balance of magnification, field of view, and weight; I’d recommend going for 8×42, like my Opticron pair.
  • Find a birding buddy. One thing I found that helped most to build my confidence was to ask other birders to show me what they were looking at, and share any tips they had that would help me remember the bird for next time. Most birders are friendly and love to share their passion with others, so say hello next time you visit a hide. Twitter is also a great way to find people; follow your local nature reserves, and you’ll soon pick up other birders that will help build your skills.
  • Get to know your local patch. Find a nearby area that looks likely, such as your garden, a nature reserve, a stretch of coast, or any green space, and visit it often. You’ll soon start to see patterns and changes in the birds you see, and their behaviours, as the seasons change around you.
  • Swot up on species. Most nature reserves and hides have a sightings board or book with the birds that have been spotted recently. Match up the list with the pictures in your guide so you know what you’re looking for. You’ll also find online lists that tell you what to expect in your area, and any recent sightings of interest. There may also be a local ornithology group that you can join.

Maker:S,Date:2017-9-29,Ver:6,Lens:Kan03,Act:Lar02,E-ve

The best books and guides for budding birdwatchers

  • How to be a Bad Birdwatcher, by Simon Barnes. A bad birdwatcher is a good thing. This book is a brilliant introduction into why watching birds is about tapping into your joy in the natural world.
  • The Collins Bird Guide, by Lars Svensson and Killian Mullarney. The most comprehensive and current book covering British and European birds, and worth investing in if you’re keen to improve your ID skills.
  • RSPB Bird Identifier. A feature on the RSPB website which suggests what you might have seen by answering a few questions, e.g. Where did you see it? What colour was it? What was it doing? and so on.
  • Identifying Birds by Behaviour, by Dominic Couzens. This book will supplement your field guide, and gives an interesting background into bird behaviour.
  • Birds Britannica, by Mark Coker and Richard Mabey. A rich study of the cultural and social connections between birds and people through history, filled with fabulous pictures.

birdwatching_scope_1.1.jpeg

There are also a number of apps you can download to help with identification and recording species while you’re out and about.

Do you like to spend time birdwatching?
What’s been the most interesting bird you’ve seen on your travels?
Let me know in the comments below.
Advertisements

Why I Think You Should Travel

I’m often asked why I feel the need to travel so often, so extensively, and to places that don’t really feature on the radar for many people as they plan their holidays (Hello Mam!). Often I can’t explain exactly why somewhere appeals to me, just that it does, and I can get there. So this is an attempt to draw together my thoughts, and give some justification for developing this blog.

Travelling is the very soul of These Vagabond Shoes (pun totally intended!), and it’s my belief that the opportunities travel provides for new experiences, exposure to new ideas, and feeling that flux state of being on the move is a good thing for everyone.

Meeting other people, particularly people from a different culture or background to yourself, talking with them, listening to their stories, and sharing their food goes a long way to extending our understanding of each other, and diminishing that deep fear of the different and unknown. It also challenges our tightly-held perceptions, provokes questions, and tests our own resilience. It’s the first tentative steps towards changing the world for the better.

My hope, idealistic as it may be, is that the readers of this blog might start to think of opportunities available to them, to travel widely and openly, and embrace chances to step outside their comfort zone now and again. And for those that perhaps face greater barriers than most, the chance to join me vicariously on my way to some places they may be unlikely to ever visit.

So to that end, I’ve compiled an epic list of reasons I think that travel is a winner, inspired by my own experiences and those of other writers, bloggers, and people that I’ve met along the way. I might dip into it now and again, to take a deeper look at an idea, and it’s not a definitive list by any means, so expect it to grow over time too.

Let me know your thoughts in the comments below, or get in touch on social media.

 

Why should you travel?

Once the travel bug bites there is no known antidote, and I know that I shall be happily infected until the end of my life.

Michael Palin

  • To break out of your comfort zone
  • To find the time to think
  • To escape from the everyday routine
  • To learn how to really relax

fiji_boat_1

Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness.

Mark Twain

  • To break down boundaries
  • To meet people from a different culture
  • To improve foreign language skills
  • To smash the stereotypes in your thinking

Wherever you go becomes a part of you somehow.

Anita Desai

  • To heal, and rebuild what’s broken
  • To grow, exponentially, in confidence
  • To become a more flexible and adaptable person
  • To do something you’d never normally do, and be proud of that

Travel brings power and love back into your life.

Rumi

  • To light a fire of creativity
  • To inspire new passions
  • To make the wine taste better (or whatever your poison is)
  • To sample new food tastes

fiji_market_1

If I’m an advocate for anything, it’s to move. As far as you can, as much as you can. Across the ocean, or simply across the river. The extent to which you can walk in someone else’s shoes or at least eat their food, it’s a plus for everybody.

Open your mind, get up off the couch, move.

Anthony Bourdain

  • To speak to new people and make new friends
  • To find the kindness of strangers
  • To meet face-to-face the things you’ve read about or seen on screen
  • To collect mementos and images to colour your everyday life

Maker:S,Date:2017-9-29,Ver:6,Lens:Kan03,Act:Lar02,E-Y

There are as many worlds as there are kinds of days, and as an opal changes its colours and its fire to match the nature of a day, so do I.

John Steinbeck

  • To learn to appreciate the small things in life
  • To hear birdsong
  • To feel sheer, unrestrained joy
  • To embrace the feeling of being lost
  • To find yourself again

The joy of life comes from our encounters with new experiences, and hence there is no greater joy than to have an endlessly changing horizon, for each day to have a new and different sun.

Christopher McCandless

  • To get up close and personal with the natural world
  • To watch the sun rise, and set, on a different horizon
  • To be totally and completely awestruck
  • To follow in someone’s footsteps
  • To blaze your own trails

tongariro_1

The world is big and I want to have a good look at it before it gets dark.

John Muir

  • To fill the blank spaces in your geography knowledge
  • To give global politics a relatable backdrop
  • To make history live
  • To share stories about your home and your experience

Travel makes one modest. You see what a tiny place you occupy in the world.

Gustave Flaubert

  • To get more comfortable in your own company
  • To become more mature
  • To create stories to tell your children, and grandchildren
  • To remain young at heart, whatever your age

And we travel, in essence, to become young fools again – to slow time down and get taken in, and fall in love once more.

Pico Iyer

  • To trace your roots, and shake your branches
  • To be thankful for what you currently have
  • To remember just how lucky you are
  • To appreciate what waits for you at home

DSC_0796-01

Why do you go away? So that you can come back. So that you can see the place you came from with new eyes and extra colours. And the people there see you differently, too. Coming back to where you started is not the same as never leaving.

Terry Pratchett, A Hat Full of Sky

  • To change the path of your career, or your whole life
  • To overcome the fear
  • To be yourself
  • To live your best life, no regrets

… because there was nowhere to go but everywhere, keep rolling under the stars…

Jack Kerouac, On the Road

What would you add to the list?