What I’ve been reading this season | Summer 2021

Climate Crisis

Our climate change turning point is right here, right now.

An article by Rebecca Solnit that examines our inability to recognise the impending climate crisis without a tangible catastrophe as we make our transition into the anthropocene era.

Just how historic was Western Canada’s heat wave? Nothing can compare.

An article from The Tyee outlining the devastating impact of the “heat dome” conditions experienced in North America in June and July 2021.

A heatwave thawed Siberia’s tundra. Now, it’s on fire.

A National Geographic article examining the devastating impact of fire in the boreal forests and tundra peatland regions of northern Siberia, ecosystems that lie over frozen permafrost soils.

We’re here to see the Great Doomed Thing.

A heartfelt longform essay by Robert Moor reconciling personal tragedy, as his partner survives a near-death experience, with a recuperation visit to a fragile ecosystem, and examining the idea that travel is heavy with personal meaning and ecological consequence.

Rewilding and Regeneration

Regeneration at Mar Lodge Estate.

Andrew Painting, Seasonal Ecologist for National Trust for Scotland at Mar Lodge Estate, the largest National Nature Reserve in the UK, located in the heart of the Cairngorms, describes the changes happening on a walk in Glen Quoich, Clais Fhearnaig and Glen Lui.

The Bleak Industrial Beauty of Scotland’s Heather Moorlands.

In an extract from his latest book, Stephen Rutt examines the intensive management of heather moorland for grouse shooting through muirburn, and the impact on the ecology of our uplands.

The Willow Walk: Why a team of volunteers carried 3,000 saplings into the Cairngorms

At the beginning of June, on a sparklingly clear day, I was one of the volunteers to lend a hand to transporting a few thousand downy willow saplings over the Cairngorm plateau to their new home in the Loch Avon basin. Sydney Henderson of Cairngorms Connect describes the project.

Let Kinloch Castle fall into curated decay, and become the ruin Scotland needs.

An interesting proposal from Fraser Macdonald, to recognise the continued costly upkeep of a piece of built heritage, a decadent folly, is unsustainable, and a move to managed decline, curated decay, would seem logical. And might just rock the established order in heritage conservation.

The Great Outdoors

New to outdoor adventure in Britain? Here’s how to keep yourself safe.

An excellent article by Ash Routen encouraging us to take responsibility for their own safety in the outdoors and develop a sense of self reliance as they push their boundaries. Timely too, with the number of people discovering their love of hillwalking, camping, and other outdoor activities on the increase.

‘It is treated as a commodity to be conquered.’ Can mountain tourism ever be truly sustainable?

A thoughtful piece on the damage caused to fragile mountain environments by mass tourism by Nick Drainey, and a potential slow travel solution in the form of the ecomuseum concept.

Connecting People and Places: A Policy Statement on Rangering in Scotland

A document produced by Nature Scot on the tangible benefits of an effective family of Ranger services across Scotland.

What I’ve been reading this season | Winter 20/21

A collection of interesting, thought-provoking, and beautiful essays, articles and blog posts from around the internet I’ve found or were shared with me over the past few months. This season, it’s mostly been pieces that examine the balance between different forms of recreation and conservation, and the perceptions we hold of certain activities versus their realities, that I want to pass on to you.

Mountain Matters

Is the first winter ascent of K2 a turning point for Sherpa mountaineering?

Reporting on the historic winter first ascent of K2, Mark Horell examines the collaborative summiting by a team of Nepalese climbers, and reflects on the often overlooked presence of Sherpas in the history of high-altitude mountaineering.

Can we see past the myth of the Himalaya?

Akash Kapur explores the notion that our romantic perceptions of the high Himalaya obscure the realities of the people who make the region home, and how histories, geographies, and ecologies or mountain areas are often shaped by expectations.

Is it time to stop climbing mountains? Obsession with reaching the summit is a modern invention

An interesting piece by Dawn Hollis that dives into mountain history, mountaineering, and managing mountain environments against the backdrop of the global climate crisis. Are we prepared to ask ourselves hard questions about factors that drive us to stand on summits, and the sacrifices we’re willing to make to do so?

Hard Knocks on Ben Nevis

The remarkable Gwen Moffat shares a valuable lesson on walking the fine line between difficult and deadly.

Killing in the Name of

The Deer Cull Dilemma

A longform essay from 2018 by Cal Flynn on the culling of deer in the Scottish Highlands, that dives deeply into the local and national politics of killing for conservation, slaughter tourism, the culture and tradition of sporting estates, and the long-standing inequalities of land ownership and community participation.

How the Shooting Industry is Exploiting the Legacy of the Clearances

Reducing the number of red deer in the Scottish Highlands is a necessary step in the ecological restoration of the landscape, but can be seen as an unpalatable activity. David Lintern reports on the thought-provoking film The Cull for TGO Magazine.

Who Wants to Shoot an Elephant?

A masterful longform piece by Wells Tower, exploring the mindset of those participating in trophy hunting, and the ethics of commercial hunting for charismatic species as a tool for wildlife management in conservation. It includes a powerful description of the death of an elephant.

Staying with a Hunter Showed Me Greenland Beyond the Tourist Brochures

Nancy Campbell writes about living with subsistence hunters in western Greenland as a rapidly-changing world reshapes their traditional knowledge and experiences.

A Dark Miracle in the Forest of Dean

In most of the UK the likelihood of encountering large animals with the potential to cause us harm is very limited. Chantal Lyons explores where potential wildlife encounters are shaped by fear rather than wonder, and the rewilding of our senses.

Remembering Barry Lopez

Best known for the seminal Arctic Dreams, a natural history of northern lives and landscapes, and how these shaped and have been shaped by human experience. Lopez died from cancer in December 2020.

Why the World Needs Barry Lopez

A deeply thoughtful profile of the writer and his last book by Kate Harris. Horizon explores the almost unbearable beauty of our planet through moments gleaned from Lopez’s lifetime, and contemplates the point where true places meet myth and speculation, where earth, sky, sea, ice and sunlight merge.

My goal that day was intimacy—the tactile, olfactory, visual, and sonic details of what, to most people in my culture, would appear to be a wasteland.

Barry Lopez

Love in a Time of Terror: On Natural Landscapes, Metaphorical Living, Warlpiri Identity

Powerful words from Barry Lopez about turning ecological grief into fierce passion, and passion into advocacy for the natural world on our besieged planet.

Photo Journal: Machair Wildflowers on the Isle of Coll

The island of Coll is breathtakingly beautiful.  The sort of place where you leave a little piece of your heart behind when you finally bring yourself to leave.

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The sweeping arc of Feall Bay, on the southwestern coast of Coll

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The beaches of Feall and Crossapol are separated by a fixed dune system rising over 50 metres in places, including a large swathe of flower-rich machair

The turquoise waters of the Sea of the Hebrides wash up on sweeping silver-white beaches backed by lofty, marram-clad dunes, reaching over 50 metres high behind the strand at Feall.  Between the coastal bents and the bogs and bare rock inland, is a rare place; machair, a habitat unique to the Hebrides, the fringes of northwestern Scotland, and western coast of Ireland. Continue reading “Photo Journal: Machair Wildflowers on the Isle of Coll”