Why you should try birdwatching.

BirdwatchingHello. My name is Vicky, and I am a birdwatcher.

I have many and varied interests (well, don’t we all?), but one thing that makes my heart go a-flutter more than most is grabbing my binoculars and keeping tabs on the local birdlife. It started as out a necessity, a university research project mapping the food web of an intertidal mudflat. Just work out who eats what…, and my interest grew slowly from that.

I’ve watched spear-sharp gannets dive for fish on the Scottish coast as I sailed by. I’ve hiked into a kauri forest in New Zealand at night searching for kiwis shuffling through the undergrowth. I spotted an improbably balanced toucan in a kapok tree as I set up a bivvy in the Belizean jungle. And every autumn I watch out for skeins of brent geese, like squadrons of aircraft, returning from the Arctic to my local coast.
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What wild creature is more accessible to our eyes and ears, as close to us and everyone in the world, as universal as a bird?

David Attenborough

Birdwatching brings all kinds of small pleasures; spotting something new and exciting, or something friendly and familiar; being outdoors and feeling the wind and weather around you; becoming attuned to the surroundings and focusing on observation. For me, it beats any kind of meditation or mindfulness practice.
puffins

Five tips for beginner birders

  • Begin at the beginning. Start by noticing what’s going on in your garden or local park. You can even put some feeders out to encourage birds close to where you can see them. Observe things like size, colour, behaviour; think about how you’d describe them and start to put some names to the regular visitors. The RSPB Bird Identifier is great to help get you started.
  • Get some gear. Basic birdwatching doesn’t need much; just looking and listening can often be enough to get you started. A field guide will help with identification, as will a notebook to jot down or sketch what you’ve seen. Good walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing will make your life more comfortable out in the field. Investing in pair of binoculars is the next step. Beginner level binoculars can be picked up for between £50 and £100, and decent pairs are often available second hand. Look for a good balance of magnification, field of view, and weight; I’d recommend going for 8×42, like my Opticron pair.
  • Find a birding buddy. One thing I found that helped most to build my confidence was to ask other birders to show me what they were looking at, and share any tips they had that would help me remember the bird for next time. Most birders are friendly and love to share their passion with others, so say hello next time you visit a hide. Twitter is also a great way to find people; follow your local nature reserves, and you’ll soon pick up other birders that will help build your skills.
  • Get to know your local patch. Find a nearby area that looks likely, such as your garden, a nature reserve, a stretch of coast, or any green space, and visit it often. You’ll soon start to see patterns and changes in the birds you see, and their behaviours, as the seasons change around you.
  • Swot up on species. Most nature reserves and hides have a sightings board or book with the birds that have been spotted recently. Match up the list with the pictures in your guide so you know what you’re looking for. You’ll also find online lists that tell you what to expect in your area, and any recent sightings of interest. There may also be a local ornithology group that you can join.

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The best books and guides for budding birdwatchers

  • How to be a Bad Birdwatcher, by Simon Barnes. A bad birdwatcher is a good thing. This book is a brilliant introduction into why watching birds is about tapping into your joy in the natural world.
  • The Collins Bird Guide, by Lars Svensson and Killian Mullarney. The most comprehensive and current book covering British and European birds, and worth investing in if you’re keen to improve your ID skills.
  • RSPB Bird Identifier. A feature on the RSPB website which suggests what you might have seen by answering a few questions, e.g. Where did you see it? What colour was it? What was it doing? and so on.
  • Identifying Birds by Behaviour, by Dominic Couzens. This book will supplement your field guide, and gives an interesting background into bird behaviour.
  • Birds Britannica, by Mark Coker and Richard Mabey. A rich study of the cultural and social connections between birds and people through history, filled with fabulous pictures.

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There are also a number of apps you can download to help with identification and recording species while you’re out and about.

Do you like to spend time birdwatching?
What’s been the most interesting bird you’ve seen on your travels?
Let me know in the comments below.
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How to care for your hiking boots

Maker:S,Date:2017-9-29,Ver:6,Lens:Kan03,Act:Lar02,E-YAs a ranger I practically live in outdoor gear, and everything I own gets pretty heavily used and abused through my usual working day. Like my hiking boots, which I wear most days (if it’s not hiking boots, I must be in either wellies or sandals. Roll on summertime!). But I do like to get the best out of my stuff, so that means I also take a bit of time to care for and maintain my gear to make sure it lasts well and keeps performing at the standard I expect it to.

These are my top tips for caring for hiking boots, and ensuring happy feet when you head out hiking:

 

Keep them fresh. Take out your insoles when you take off your boots. Most good quality boots have removable insoles for easy cleaning (and so you can replace with custom orthotics), and these can become warm, sweaty sponges swarming with bacteria. Eventually they’ll start to smell and it can also degrade the materials of the boot. Let them dry out overnight next to your boots between uses, and they’ll be good to go.

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Keep them clean. Mud can ruin the outer material of your boots if it stays on for too long. If the mud has dried, I knock off as much as I can before washing my boots, including digging out muck from the cleats on the sole. I rinse off as much as I can under a tap or hose, and have an old dish scrubbing brush to get the last of the mud off.

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Dry carefully. It can be tempting to just drop your boots by the radiator or in front of the fire, but too much direct heat can crack leather and even melt the sole. Instead, let them dry in a warm and airy place, like a drying room, airing cupboard, or even outside in the sun.  Leaving the fire free for you to lounge around in front of.

Deal with soggy boots. Sometimes you just get completely saturated, whether its from ridiculously heavy rain or wading through a bog (or both. Hello, Glen Quoich!), and they’ll need to be dealt with before you store your boots. Take out the insoles, and rinse out the inside, giving stubborn dirt a light scrub.   Give your insoles a good scrub with soap, working it into the material with your fingers, and rinse well. Stuff the boots with newspaper, and leave to dry in a well-ventilated area. You might need to replace the paper several times. Sprinkling a tablespoon of bicarbonate of soda into each nearly-dry boot will kill the stink before it starts.

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Keep them waterproofed. Repeated immersion in mud and water starts to ruin the waterproofing on your boots, whether they’re leather or synthetic, so you’ll need to reapply a waterproof treatment occasionally. Nikwax Fabric and Leather Proof is my usual choice, as I can treat my leather boots and synthetic trail running shoes with the same product. It doesn’t need much, just a thin layer will do the trick.  I’ll also use dubbin or wax on my leather boots regularly to keep the outers supple and comfortable for walking in.

Avoid seawater. Getting your boots wet at the beach can start metal grommets and hooks rusting, and saltwater isn’t great for the condition of leather either. Rinse your boots in freshwater as soon as you can, and dry them as described above. Giving the metalwork an occasional spray of WD40 will also help if you visit the shore regularly.

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Do you have any tips to add? Let me know in the comments below.